Our San Juan Islands

Conserve now. Enjoy forever.

The San Juan Preservation Trust works with our local communities and people like you to permanently conserve and care for special places throughout the San Juan Islands.

Together with our landowner partners, the Preservation Trust—a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization—has permanently protected more than 300 properties, 45 miles of shoreline, 27 miles of trails and 18,000 acres on 20 islands.

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SEE UPCOMING EVENTS
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A misty morning at Red Mill Farm Preserve, the largest working farm in the San Juans. A farmer who leases the land manages a large herd of cattle here. This curious steer (male cow) is hungry for his hay breakfast!

(Thanks for sharing, Heather!)
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A misty morning at Red Mill Farm Preserve, the largest working farm in the San Juans. A farmer who leases the land manages a large herd of cattle here. This curious steer (male cow) is hungry for his hay breakfast!

(Thanks for sharing, Heather!)

Comment on Facebook

What a great pic!

A plate limpet (Lottia scutum) shell washed up on the beach at low tide. Limpets of various species are a common site on rocks around the San Juan Islands. Fun facts: limpets are a type of snail, and they have rows of tiny teeth which they use to scrape algae off of rocks!!

#WildlifeWednesday
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A plate limpet (Lottia scutum) shell washed up on the beach at low tide. Limpets of various species are a common site on rocks around the San Juan Islands. Fun facts: limpets are a type of snail, and they have rows of tiny teeth which they use to scrape algae off of rocks!!

#WildlifeWednesday

Last week, a group of eight high-school-age campers and three counselors from Camp Nor'wester (located on Johns Island) came to Shaw Island and stayed at SJPT's Ellis Family Preserve for a two-night community service outing.

The campers slept out under the stars, brought their own food, and hauled away all their garbage/recycling. They helped build part of a new, quarter-mile-long trail loop.

Most of the campers had never built trails before, so Stewardship Manager Kathleen Foley provided training in tool use. They spent some time during breaks identifying trees and shrubs, and talking about forest ecology. Caretaker Ruthie Dougherty gave a nice introduction to the preserve to help set the context.

The campers spent time doing daily reflections, and even wrote a song about their time "on the Ellis land."
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Thanks for telling the story of this camping adventure.

Awesome!!

Super cool!

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