Our San Juan Islands

Conserve now. Enjoy forever.

The San Juan Preservation Trust works with our local communities and people like you to permanently conserve and care for special places throughout the San Juan Islands.

We acknowledge that we reside on the ancestral lands and waters of the Coast Salish people, who have called this place home since time immemorial, and we honor the inherent, aboriginal, and treaty rights that have been passed down from generation to generation.

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Branches brought down by windstorms offer an excellent opportunity to study lichens growing in the canopy. Check out what our Land Steward, Rob Roy, has been noticing lately.

It's good to know that lichens don't harm trees. They derive their water and nutrients form the atmosphere. In fact— some, like Lobaria pulminaria, are important sources of nitrogen because the Cyanobacteria living in them can fix nitrogen from the air. When storms bring down the lichen— that nitrogen is cycled into the dirt!

Click on the photos for identification and more information.

#SanJuanIslands #Lichens
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you guys are nerdy cute

Gorgeous stuff!

Coolness times 10!

Lichens are so cool!

Gorgeous!!

Old Moss Woman's Secret Garden. Lichens!!

Cool!! I did not know that!

Intriguing!

Love this. Thanks

Awesome! Thank you 🙏🏽

Awesome!!

I’m Lichen it!

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Have you heard about the Conservation Agricultural Resource Team (CART)?

CART is a working group, established by the San Juan County Land Bank, that provides input on the future of the Coffelt Farm Preserve on Orcas Island.

"The goal of CART is to evaluate future scenarios for the farm, both in terms of the economic viability of the farming operation and the organizational structure needed to manage and operate the farm to meet the Land Bank’s and community’s goals. CART includes representatives of agriculture and conservation-related agencies and organizations [including Preservation Trust staff], as well as members of the farming community."

If you would like to review the draft report, or register to attend the upcoming public meeting, please follow this link:

http://sjclandbank.org/advisory-committee-to-land-…

Coffelt Farm Conservation Easement | Staff archive
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Have you heard about the Conservation Agricultural Resource Team (CART)? 

CART is a working group, established by the San Juan County Land Bank, that provides input on the future of the Coffelt Farm Preserve on Orcas Island. 

The goal of CART is to evaluate future scenarios for the farm, both in terms of the economic viability of the farming operation and the organizational structure needed to manage and operate the farm to meet the Land Bank’s and community’s goals. CART includes representatives of agriculture and conservation-related agencies and organizations [including Preservation Trust staff], as well as members of the farming community. 

If you would like to review the draft report, or register to attend the upcoming public meeting, please follow this link: 

http://sjclandbank.org/advisory-committee-to-land-bank-seeks-community-input-on-recommendations-for-coffelt-farm-preserve/

Coffelt Farm Conservation Easement | Staff archive

Today we praise our hearty, year-round resident: the Dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis).

Juncos grow down "jackets" which allow them to remain in the San Juan Islands during cold winters. Their winter plumage makes them 30% heavier than they are in the summer. Who can relate? 😉

These social creatures live in small flocks of up to 25 birds during the autumn and winter. Each flock has a strictly organized hierarchy and occupies territories of around 12 acres.

When searching for juncos, keep an eye out for their quintessential pink beak. Their is much diversity in the colors and patterns of this species— with up to 16 subspecies found from Canada to Mexico.

Happy (belated) #nationalbirdday!

Dark-eyed junco at Turtleback Mountain Preserve | Kurt Thorson
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Today we praise our hearty, year-round resident: the Dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis). 

Juncos grow down jackets which allow them to remain in the San Juan Islands during cold winters. Their winter plumage makes them 30% heavier than they are in the summer. Who can relate? 😉

These social creatures live in small flocks of up to 25 birds during the autumn and winter. Each flock has a strictly organized hierarchy and occupies territories of around 12 acres. 

When searching for juncos, keep an eye out for their quintessential pink beak. Their is much diversity in the colors and patterns of this species— with up to 16 subspecies found from Canada to Mexico.

Happy (belated) #nationalbirdday!

Dark-eyed junco at Turtleback Mountain Preserve | Kurt Thorson

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Your friend, Sandra Hunter.

Once again, taking comfort in nature while madness reigns in the human realm.

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