Our San Juan Islands

Conserve now. Enjoy forever.

The San Juan Preservation Trust works with our local communities and people like you to permanently conserve and care for special places throughout the San Juan Islands.

We acknowledge that we reside on the ancestral lands and waters of the Coast Salish people, who have called this place home since time immemorial, and we honor the inherent, aboriginal, and treaty rights that have been passed down from generation to generation.

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Happy Juneteenth!

Slavery is a moral taint on U.S. history that we are still reckoning with (and have a long way to go)—but the proclamation of emancipation in Galveston, Texas (the last rebel holdout) on June 19, 1865, is an occasion for reflection and celebration each year on this brand-new federal holiday, officially named "Juneteenth National Independence Day."
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Happy Juneteenth! 

Slavery is a moral taint on U.S. history that we are still reckoning with (and have a long way to go)—but the proclamation of emancipation in Galveston, Texas (the last rebel holdout) on June 19, 1865, is an occasion for reflection and celebration each year on this brand-new federal holiday, officially named Juneteenth National Independence Day.

Looking for a good summer read? Pick up Nature's Best Hope by Dr. Douglas Tallamy! If you haven't heard of Dr. Tallamy elsewhere, you will—he's big in the conservation world.

This book urges us, citizens of the world, to unleash the "wild" in our yards. With the spread of development, we can no longer rely solely on preserved lands to protect biodiversity. Nature is no longer "over there", it's "right here".

One of Dr. Tallamy's take-home messages is to actively convert a portion of our outdoor spaces back into native plant habitat. His name for this revolution: Home Grown National Park.

Why? Because many plants and insects are locked into a dependent relationship that took millennia to develop. Due to co-evolution, most insects have very specialized host plants, which is why exotic or non-native landscapes are, for the most part, sterile and unsuitable habitat for most native species.

One hallmark of ecosystem productivity is energy moving through it. In a native landscape, there's more insects who can eat the leaves, which means more "plankton of the terrestrial" for the birds, reptiles, and small mammals.

There's even a new website called Native Plant Finder that's based on Dr. Tallamy's research: .

What will you plant in your yard this year?

#NativePlants #HomeGrownNationalPark #NaturesBestHope
... See MoreSee Less

Looking for a good summer read? Pick up Natures Best Hope by Dr. Douglas Tallamy! If you havent heard of Dr. Tallamy elsewhere, you will—hes big in the conservation world.

This book urges us, citizens of the world, to unleash the wild in our yards. With the spread of development, we can no longer rely solely on preserved lands to protect biodiversity. Nature is no longer over there, its right here. 

One of Dr. Tallamys take-home messages is to actively convert a portion of our outdoor spaces back into native plant habitat. His name for this revolution: Home Grown National Park. 

Why? Because many plants and insects are locked into a dependent relationship that took millennia to develop. Due to co-evolution, most insects have very specialized host plants, which is why exotic or non-native landscapes are, for the most part, sterile and unsuitable habitat for most native species. 

One hallmark of ecosystem productivity is energy moving through it. In a native landscape, theres more insects who can eat the leaves, which means more plankton of the terrestrial for the birds, reptiles, and small mammals. 

Theres even a new website called Native Plant Finder thats based on Dr. Tallamys research: https://www.nwf.org/nativeplantfinder/.

What will you plant in your yard this year?

#NativePlants #HomeGrownNationalPark #NaturesBestHope
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