Our San Juan Islands

Conserve now. Enjoy forever.

The San Juan Preservation Trust works with our local communities and people like you to permanently conserve and care for special places throughout the San Juan Islands.

Together with our landowner partners, the Preservation Trust—a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization—has permanently protected more than 300 properties, 45 miles of shoreline, 27 miles of trails and 18,000 acres on 20 islands.

See “Just a Minute”
join or renew
SEE UPCOMING EVENTS
Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Part of our island's natural riches, often overlooked, is a native shrub: Salal (other names: Gaultheria shallon, sala’xbupt, or Makah).

Did you know that salal berries can stay on the plant all winter without getting moldy? They are packed with higher levels of antioxidants than most other berries.

Traditionally salal berreis were a staple food for northwest coastal peoples. They would be mashed and dried into cakes and fruit leather that would keep throughout the winter. The leaves have medicinal properties that were used to treat a wide range of ailments.

While you meander though the woods of the PNW, take notice of this abundant evergreen shrub —it may be one of the most important plants in this region. Plus, the berries are now ripe. 😉

Salal berries on a Conservation Easement | Elli Blaine
... See MoreSee Less

Part of our islands natural riches, often overlooked, is a native shrub: Salal (other names: Gaultheria shallon, sala’xbupt, or Makah). 

Did you know that salal berries can stay on the plant all winter without getting moldy? They are packed with higher levels of antioxidants than most other berries.

Traditionally salal berreis were a staple food for northwest coastal peoples. They would be mashed and dried into cakes and fruit leather that would keep throughout the winter. The leaves have medicinal properties that were used to treat a wide range of ailments.

While you meander though the woods of the PNW, take notice of this abundant evergreen shrub —it may be one of the most important plants in this region. Plus, the berries are now ripe. ;) 

Salal berries on a Conservation Easement | Elli Blaine

Comment on Facebook Part of our island's...

Katie

I picked and froze some the other day on our property and I’m going to make a vinegar shrub out of them for cocktails!

Snack on these every chance I get it. Love the idea of mashing them and making cakes. Gonna give that a try!

My mother used to put them in pancakes when we were over on Johns Is.

I've made great jam from these berries. Strong!

We make the best muffins with Salal berries, the baking brings out the sweetness. We use this recipe: cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/2868-jordan-marshs-blueberry-muffins, but use only a 1/4 cup sugar.

Foraging at its best! I think with the pandemic and economic free-fall, the value of our native plants as a food source will be highlighted.

Megan Jones

View more comments

1 week ago

San Juan Preservation Trust

Check out this Stair-step Moss (Hylocomium splendens) that Dean is teaching the SJICC about (close-up in the upper left corner).

It is called Stair-step Moss because every year it grows another step-like arrangement of feathery 'fronds'. By counting each step, you can find out how many years the moss has been growing. The more time it has to grow, the springier the forest's green carpet will be!

Photo: Dean Dougherty with SJICC | Graham Preserve
... See MoreSee Less

Check out this Stair-step Moss (Hylocomium splendens) that Dean is teaching the SJICC about (close-up in the upper left corner). 

It is called Stair-step Moss because every year it grows another step-like arrangement of feathery fronds. By counting each step, you can find out how many years the moss has been growing. The more time it has to grow, the springier the forests green carpet will be! 

Photo: Dean Dougherty with SJICC | Graham Preserve
Load more