Our San Juan Islands

Conserve now. Enjoy forever.

The San Juan Preservation Trust works with our local communities and people like you to permanently conserve and care for special places throughout the San Juan Islands.

Together with our landowner partners, the Preservation Trust—a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization—has permanently protected more than 300 properties, 45 miles of shoreline, 27 miles of trails and 18,000 acres on 20 islands.

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We hope your Memorial Day weekend goes swimmingly! ... See MoreSee Less

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Happy World Bee Day!

In Thor Hanson's latest book – “Buzz” – he points out that Cowlitz Bay Preserve (https://sjpt.org/preserves-easements/cowlitz-bay/) hosts the largest documented digger bee colony in the world!

Digger bees (genus: Anthophora) are solitary nesters, although they live very close to their neighbors, in a community, along sandy sea bluffs. Each female digs a small tunnel about 6" deep where she packs nectar and pollen to sustain her larvae.

Males are the first to hatch in the spring and wait around to pass on their genes to the females once they emerge. After this, their job is done – they do not assist with the digging or feeding of the next generation.

Digger bees are often mistaken for bumblebees because of their plump bodies and thick, fuzzy hair (making them awesome pollinators). It's great to know that this large colony on Waldron Island is protected in perpetuity.

#worldbeeday #pollinators #waldronisland #sanjuanislands
... See MoreSee Less

Happy World Bee Day!

In Thor Hansons latest book – “Buzz” – he points out that Cowlitz Bay Preserve (https://sjpt.org/preserves-easements/cowlitz-bay/) hosts the largest documented digger bee colony in the world! 

Digger bees (genus: Anthophora) are solitary nesters, although they live very close to their neighbors, in a community, along sandy sea bluffs. Each female digs a small tunnel about 6 deep where she packs nectar and pollen to sustain her larvae. 

Males are the first to hatch in the spring and wait around to pass on their genes to the females once they emerge. After this, their job is done – they do not assist with the digging or feeding of the next generation. 

Digger bees are often mistaken for bumblebees because of their plump bodies and thick, fuzzy hair (making them awesome pollinators). Its great to know that this large colony on Waldron Island is protected in perpetuity. 

#worldbeeday #pollinators #waldronisland #sanjuanislands

Helping you start the week off right by sharing a beautiful entry from our Backyard Haiku Challenge last month.

Any day is a good day to take this challenge!

Read all of the entries here (and keep sending them in): https://sjpt.org/backyard-haiku-challenge/

#HaikuChallenge #SanJuanIslands
... See MoreSee Less

Helping you start the week off right by sharing a beautiful entry from our Backyard Haiku Challenge last month. 

Any day is a good day to take this challenge! 

Read all of the entries here (and keep sending them in): https://sjpt.org/backyard-haiku-challenge/

#HaikuChallenge #SanJuanIslands
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