Our San Juan Islands

Conserve now. Enjoy forever.

The San Juan Preservation Trust works with our local communities and people like you to permanently conserve and care for special places throughout the San Juan Islands.

Together with our landowner partners, the Preservation Trust—a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization—has permanently protected more than 300 properties, 45 miles of shoreline, 27 miles of trails and 18,000 acres on 20 islands.

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How fortunate SJPT is to have volunteers who are energetic and charged to help us steward the land. We held two work parties last weekend, one on the Henry Island Preserve where Hernderson’s Checkermallow was planted (a native wildflower that historically grew on the isthmus but has since disappeared), and one on the Ellis Preserve furthering the progress of a new trail system.

Both crews had a wonderful time in the sun and in each other’s company. The real high point of the day for the Henry Island folks was spotting a family of Western bluebirds foraging happily on the isthmus – a first sighting on Henry, to the best of our knowledge! Here’s to progress made for the earth and sky!

If you are interested in connecting in a tangible way to our preserves and the creatures we strive to support, please view our calendar for some upcoming fall events.

https://sjpt.org/calendar/
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❤❤❤❤❤❤

5 days ago

San Juan Preservation Trust

Check out the no-till seeding trials at Beaverton Marsh Preserve, and WSU's Hay Improvement Workshop this Friday, Oct. 11. ... See MoreSee Less

Check out the no-till seeding trials at Beaverton Marsh Preserve, and WSUs Hay Improvement Workshop this Friday, Oct. 11.Image attachment

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Thanks for the explanation. I've been wondering what was going on out there.

Were you a late bloomer? Find a kindred spirit in Grindelia integrifolia (also known as gumweed) whose flowers are now in bloom and will be as late as November. This native plant is the source of pollen and nectar for butterflies, native bees, and other beneficial insects who have limited food sources this late in the season. The Coast Salish also found uses for this plant by extracting its resin to cure lung ailments as well as certain dermatitis.

Gumweed can be found in meadows, prairies, driftwood covered beaches, and rocky shorelines. This wide range of habitats is possible due to its high tolerance for harsh soil conditions. A great native flower to use in restoration projects!
#sanjuanislands #nativeplants
... See MoreSee Less

Were you a late bloomer? Find a kindred spirit in Grindelia integrifolia (also known as gumweed) whose flowers are now in bloom and will be as late as November. This native plant is the source of pollen and nectar for butterflies, native bees, and other beneficial insects who have limited food sources this late in the season.  The Coast Salish also found uses for this plant by extracting its resin to cure lung ailments as well as certain dermatitis.

Gumweed can be found in meadows, prairies, driftwood covered beaches, and rocky shorelines. This wide range of habitats is possible due to its high tolerance for harsh soil conditions. A great native flower to use in restoration projects!
#sanjuanislands #nativeplants
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