///Summer 2018
Summer 20182018-09-20T20:07:00+00:00

Island Dispatch | Summer 2018

THE PRESERVATION TRUST AND THE COUNTY LAND BANK

Conservation Partners with a Difference

Paul Walsh

If you’re a little hazy about the difference between the San Juan Preservation Trust and the San Juan County Land Bank, you’re not alone. While both organizations protect important natural areas within the islands, there are some clear differences between our missions and mandates.

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FROM LEFT: KAYLA, GENEVIEVE, BEN | CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

NEW FACES OF SUMMER

Please join us in welcoming three highly talented and qualified (and pretty darn nice) temporary staff members.

Kayla Seaforth joined us in March as Turtleback Mountain Restoration Technician. Kayla is a regular outdoor ninja, with certifications in whitewater rescue, avalanche rescue, wilderness first response, wildland firefighting, and open water diving. Most recently, she helped coordinate FEMA’s response to Hurricane Harvey in Texas. She also has extensive experience as a Washington Conservation Corps crew member. Her main job with us is to manage the ongoing restoration of Garry oak savannah habitat on the south side of Turtleback.

Genevieve Shank started in April as our 2018 Avian Field Tech for the Western Bluebird Reintroduction project. Genevieve hails from Bellevue and is a 2013 graduate of Western Washington University. Her field experience as a wildlife biologist includes salmon-hatchery work, avian surveys, and work with mammals ranging from pygmy rabbits to black bears. This season she’s responsible for searching for bluebirds, monitoring and maintaining nest boxes, and managing translocations and aviaries.

Benjamin Hallowell came aboard in June as our 2018 Fred E. Ellis Summer Intern. He’s a fresh graduate of the University of Vermont, where he concentrated in environmental studies. Last summer he interned at the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, doing things like monitoring
conservation easements and compiling GPS data into Geographic Information System (GIS) maps. He’ll be helping us with those tasks and much more.

CELEBRATING LEGACIES

The San Juan Preservation is, at its heart, a legacy organization, committed to protecting special island places for future generations. As such, legacy gifts from the members of our Gann Society provide essential fuel for the long-term future of the Preservation Trust and its mission.

As a gesture of our appreciation and thanks, Gann Society members were invited to attend one of two luncheons that took place in June. A total of 50 society members gathered at Westcott Bay Shellfish Farm (on San Juan Island) and the Catkin Café (on Orcas) to enjoy good food and conversation. Over dessert, SJPT executive director Angela Anderson described some of the Preservation Trust’s work near each of the venues, from Henry Island to Entrance Mountain.

A few attendees shared their own stories of connection to the land. San Juan Island resident Sarah Crosby described how she and her late husband and their neighbors, the Salquists, acquired and permanently protected 10 acres on Turn Point. At the Orcas gathering, Tim Becker recalled how his father worked the family’s 17-acre farm on Crane Island with horses. The farm, which the family protected with a conservation easement in 1986, was sold recently, but the Becker Farm easement will continue to protect the agrarian character of the property in perpetuity. Please consider joining the Gann Society by including the Preservation Trust in your estate plans. Your legacy to these islands will be everlasting.

GANN SOCIETY GATHERING ON ORCAS | Staff Archive